146 stories
·
0 followers

Lawmakers want more tech companies to address privacy legislation

1 Comment
Though Facebook has been in a bright spotlight since the Cambridge Analytica fallout, it's obviously not the only company that has to deal with issues surrounding how best to protect its users' privacy. That responsibility falls on all tech companies...
Read the whole story
jbroxson
678 days ago
reply
Yeah.... now if THEY could just respect our privacy at the same level it would actually mean something. Hypocrites.
Share this story
Delete

Understanding Floating Point Numbers

1 Share

People learn in different ways, but sometimes the establishment fixates on explaining a concept in one way. If that’s not your way you might be out of luck. If you have trouble internalizing floating point number representations, the Internet is your friend. [Fabian Sanglard] (author of Game Engine Black Book: Wolfenstein 3D) didn’t like the traditional presentation of floating point numbers, so he decided to explain them a different way.

Instead of thinking of an exponent and a mantissa — the traditional terms — [Fabian] calls the exponent as a “window” that determines the range of the number between two powers of two. So the window could be from 1 to 2 or from 1 024 to 2048 or from 32768 to 65536.

Once you’ve determined the window, the mantissa — [Fabian] calls that the offset — divides the window range into 8,388,608 pieces, assuming a 32-bit float. Just like an 8-bit PWM value uses 128 for 50%, the offset (or mantissa) would be 4,194,304 if the value was halfway into the window.

There are a few details glossed over — the bias in the exponent and the assumed digit in the mantissa are in the provided formulas, but the reason for them isn’t as clearly spelled out as it would be for the “classic” explanation. If you want a go at the traditional classroom lecture on the topic, there’s one below.

We’ve talked about floating point representations and their effect on missiles. There was a time when you hated to use floating point because it was so expensive in either dollars or CPU time, but these days even a solder controller can do relatively fast math with floats.


Filed under: Software Development, software hacks



Read the whole story
jbroxson
866 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

A Very 2017 Take On A BBC Micro

1 Share

In the early 1980s, there were a plethora of 8-bit microcomputers on the market, and the chances are that if you were interested in such things you belonged to one of the different tribes of enthusiasts for a particular manufacturer’s product. If you are British though there is likely to be one machine that will provide a common frame of reference for owners of all machines of that era: The Acorn BBC Microcomputer which was ubiquitous in the nation’s schools. This 6502-driven machine is remembered today as the progenitor and host of the first ARM processors, but at the time was notable for the huge array of built-in interfaces it contained. Its relatively high price though meant that convincing your parents to buy you one instead of a ZX Spectrum was always going to be an uphill struggle.

So, you never owned a BBC Micro, and this has scarred you for life. Never mind, all is not lost, for now you can have that Acorn experience without scouring eBay for a classic micro, by running one entirely in silicon on a myStorm FPGA board.

To be fair, running classic hardware on an FPGA is nothing new and there have been a few BBC Micros implemented in this way, not to mention an Acorn Atom. But this project builds on the previous FPGA BBC Micros by porting it entirely to Verilog and incorporating some of the bug fixes from their various forks. There are screenshots of the result running several classic games, as well as test screens and a benchmark revealing it to be a faithful reproduction of a 2MHz BBC Micro.

We covered the myStorm board when it arrived last year. We’ve also brought you another FPGA board running as a coprocessor for a real BBC micro.

Thanks [monsonite] for the tip. He also alerts us that the myStorm board’s ARM microcontroller can now be programmed from the Arduino IDE.


Filed under: classic hacks



Read the whole story
jbroxson
878 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

Beautiful Retro Gaming Console that Runs on Raspberry Pi and Retro Pi @Raspberry_Pi #PiDay #Raspberrypi

1 Share

Impressive build from @kengjin!

Read the whole story
jbroxson
879 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

How to Make a Smart Security Camera with a Raspberry Pi Zero @Raspberry_Pi #PiDay #RaspberryPi

1 Share

Hacker House shared this project on Youtube!

See how we built it, including our materials, code, and supplemental instructions, on Hackster.io: https://www.hackster.io/hackerhouse/s…

In this video, we use a Raspberry Pi Zero W and a Raspberry Pi camera to make a smart security camera! The camera uses object detection (with OpenCV) to send you an email whenever it sees an intruder. It also runs a webcam so you can view live video from the camera when you are away.

See more on Youtube!


3055 06Each Friday is PiDay here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts, tutorials and new Raspberry Pi related products. Adafruit has the largest and best selection of Raspberry Pi accessories and all the code & tutorials to get you up and running in no time!

Read the whole story
jbroxson
879 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete

Bucket Bot 2: A Mobile PC based robot @Raspberry_Pi #PiDay #RaspberryPi

1 Share

FJOMCUWJ70QLVBS MEDIUM

Inventive project and write-up from instructables user CarlS. Thanks for sharing, Carl!

This is the latest version of the Bucket Bot – a mobile PC based robot that can be easily transported in a 5 gallon bucket. The previous one used simple wood based construction. This newer version is based on aluminum and T-Slot, so it is easily expandable.

The bucket bot concept is a vertically oriented robot where all the components are easily accessible. This is superior to the layered approach since you don’t need to unscrew layers to work on the lower level components. This design has the all-important features for mobile robots: a handle and motor power switch!

I also incorporated some new components that make the building easier. There is a little fabrication involved, but it can all be done using hand tools. You can also use a laser cutter for a plastic version of this robot, or use a metal cutting service like the Big Blue Saw if you would like with the included designs.

Read more.

Read the whole story
jbroxson
879 days ago
reply
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories